Cite Right: Chicago Style for Web Sites

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Web site


Mike:

From the Web site you are using pull out these elements to cite it properly. Web site citations require the title of the Web site, the author of the Web site, url of the Web site, the date the Web site was last modified (if available), and the date you accessed the Web site. They need to be reformatted and rearranged in order to comply with Chicago style guidelines. Take a look at the correct format:

4. “Merger Integration,” Bain & Company, last modified 2010, accessed July 13, 2009, http://www.bain.com/bainweb/consulting_expertise/capabilities_detail.asp?capID=65

Image


Mike:

And finally, to cite an image you found on the web you need author’s name, title of the image, the name of the organization that posted the page, url of the page where the image is used, and the accessed date. They need to be reformatted and rearranged in order to comply with Chicago style guidelines. Take a look at the correct format:

5. (Image by Mridu Singh, “HR People: Business Partners,” Planman Consulting, accessed January 9, 2009, http://www.planmanconsulting.com/post-merger-culture-shock.html)

In-text citations


Mike:

Here is the citation in the footnotes to which those in-text citations point:

1. Rahul Kapoor and Kwanghui Lim, “The Impact of Acquisitions on the Productivity of Inventors at Semiconductor Firms: A Synthesis of Knowledge Base Perspectives,” Academy of Management Journal 50, no. 5 (2007): 1133-1155, accessed January 15, 2009, http://ezproxy.umuc.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=bth&AN=27169706&login.asp&site=ehost-live&scope=site.

In Chicago style, after each place where you need to cite something place a superscript number that corresponds to the numbered footnote at the bottom of the page.  These numbers run sequentially throughout the length of the paper.

According to Kappor and Rim it is difficult to monitor the activities of inventors and to assess the quality of knowledge produced.1

For more citation examples, go to the UMUC library Web site.

Quentin:

Thanks Mike. That really explains a lot!  Now that I know how to cite properly I can go back and redo my paper.  I’m sure to get an “A” now.

Mike:

You’re welcome.  And remember, you can always contact the UMUC library if you have more questions. 

The following week in the Pictograph studios lunchroom.

Danielle:

Hi Quentin, you look so happy!

Quentin:

I am, Danielle.  I just got my paper back and I got an “A.”  The professor even commented that my citations were excellent.  I was really glad I called the UMUC librarian for help.  Now I know the importance of citation in academic research as well as how to do it properly.  This will really help me in all of my UMUC classes.

Danielle:

Those UMUC librarians are so helpful, I may take some classes there myself!

The Result


Quentin went on to finish his program at UMUC and graduated with a 4.0 grade point average. He was able to leave his executive position at Pictograph studios and he now heads his own major motion picture studio.